Visiting the Juno Beach and Utah Beach D-Day museums in Normandy before getting the ferry back to Ireland (2018 Days 71-75 Courseilles sur Mer to Cherbourg)

Today's featured photo shows the sun setting over the beach at Arromanches les Bains in Normandy. The village here is famous as the location for an artificial harbour built by the Allies after D-Day and sections of the Muberry harbour lie dotted along the beach to this day. I had been here in 2016 but … Continue reading Visiting the Juno Beach and Utah Beach D-Day museums in Normandy before getting the ferry back to Ireland (2018 Days 71-75 Courseilles sur Mer to Cherbourg)

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Quite a crowd on the Sword D-Day beach in Normandy and quite a crowd in Paris as well to welcome home the World Cup winning French team (2018 Day 71 Cabourg to Courseilles sur Mer)

Today's photo shows a beach near Ouistreham crowded with holidaymakers. This is no ordinary beach for this was one of the 5 D-day beaches and was code-named Sword Beach in June 1944. I estimate there is roughly 1000 people spread out along the beach in the above photo but on D-Day around 28,000 soldiers and … Continue reading Quite a crowd on the Sword D-Day beach in Normandy and quite a crowd in Paris as well to welcome home the World Cup winning French team (2018 Day 71 Cabourg to Courseilles sur Mer)

Cycling through the battlefields of the Aisne before visiting a forest near Compiegne where the Armistice to end World War 1 was signed (2018 Day 68 Reims to Compiegne)

Today's featured photo shows the Armistice Memorial museum in the forest of Compiegne where the Armistice was signed to end World War 1 in 1918. Inside the museum, there is a replica of the train carriage where the Armistice was signed at 5 o'clock in the morning of November the 11th 1918. The Armistice was … Continue reading Cycling through the battlefields of the Aisne before visiting a forest near Compiegne where the Armistice to end World War 1 was signed (2018 Day 68 Reims to Compiegne)

Cycling through the battlefields of the Argonne before visiting a school in Reims where the Armistice to end World War 2 was signed (2018 Days 66 – 67 Verdun to Reims)

Today's featured photo shows the cut-out of a French soldier from the Battle of Valmy which took place in 1792 between French and German armies. It was the first of five wars that would break out between France and Germany over the next 250 years. The Battle of Valmy was relatively minor and all over … Continue reading Cycling through the battlefields of the Argonne before visiting a school in Reims where the Armistice to end World War 2 was signed (2018 Days 66 – 67 Verdun to Reims)

Verdun may be eerily quiet nowadays but this place still sends shivers through the whole of France despite it being over 100 years since the end of World War 1 (2018 Day 65 Luxembourg to Verdun)

Today's featured photo shows the Douaumont cemetery and ossuary at Verdun. The Battle of Verdun lasted from February the 21st to December the 18th in 1916 and was one of the the longest and bloodiest battles in all of World War 1. Both French and German forces suffered around 400,000 casualties with around 150,000 soldiers … Continue reading Verdun may be eerily quiet nowadays but this place still sends shivers through the whole of France despite it being over 100 years since the end of World War 1 (2018 Day 65 Luxembourg to Verdun)

The Italian Front in World War 1 was just as vicious and as futile as the Western Front and yet it got no coverage at all during the Armistice Day commemorations on November the 11th (2018 Days 43-46 Trieste to Ovaro)

Today's featured photo shows the World War 1 memorial at Redipuglia near Monfalcone in north east Italy. The memorial is the largest war memorial in Italy and one of the largest memorials inn the world. The remains of over 100,000 Italian soldiers who all died between 1915 and 1918 in World War 1 are buried … Continue reading The Italian Front in World War 1 was just as vicious and as futile as the Western Front and yet it got no coverage at all during the Armistice Day commemorations on November the 11th (2018 Days 43-46 Trieste to Ovaro)

Where did Hannibal cross the Alps – Col de la Traversette (updated)

15 months ago,  I wrote an extensive article about whether Hannibal may have crossed over the Col de la Traversette in 218 BC on his way to attack the Roman army in Italy. It was based on considerable coverage in the world's media during April 2016 of the results of core samples taken by Professor … Continue reading Where did Hannibal cross the Alps – Col de la Traversette (updated)

Where did Hannibal cross the Alps – Col de Montgenevre

Last year, I wrote how there have been over 1,000 books published about Hannibal and how in almost every book, there is a different route for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps. That is a slight exaggeration but there certainly has been several hundred books published about Hannibal over the last 2,000 years. Last year, I … Continue reading Where did Hannibal cross the Alps – Col de Montgenevre

Where did Hannibal cross the Alps – Col du Petit Saint Bernard (updated)

I wrote last year, that in my opinion, the most convincing argument for where Hannibal crossed the Alps was published 130 years ago by the American historian, Theodore Ayrualt Dodge, who was convinced that Hannibal used the Petit Saint Bernard pass. Theodore Dodge was an American military historian and his book about Hannibal's life is … Continue reading Where did Hannibal cross the Alps – Col du Petit Saint Bernard (updated)

Visiting Sword, Juno, Gold, Omaha and Utah beaches in one day left an incredible impression as to the scale of the D-Day landings

(#03 - Top 10 Highlights from 2016 Tour de Travoy) The photo above shows the Les Braves D-Day memorial sculpture at Omaha Beach in Vierville-sur-Mer. The metal sculpture was created by the French artist Anilore Banon in 2004 to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day landings. The sculpture was only intended to be temporary … Continue reading Visiting Sword, Juno, Gold, Omaha and Utah beaches in one day left an incredible impression as to the scale of the D-Day landings

On the road to ruin, sorry Rouen, on the same road that hosted the world’s first bicycle race in 1869 and also the world’s first motor car race some 25 years later

(#09 - Top 10 Highlights from 2016 Tour de Travoy) The photo above shows two of the cars that competed in the world's first motor car race on Sunday July 22nd in 1894 between Paris and Rouen. It is roughly 125 km from Paris to Rouen and the fastest car that day took almost 7 … Continue reading On the road to ruin, sorry Rouen, on the same road that hosted the world’s first bicycle race in 1869 and also the world’s first motor car race some 25 years later

Cycling 100 km along the frontline of the 1914 Battle of the Marne, which was arguably the biggest and bloodiest battle of all time

(#10 - Top 10 Highlights from 2016 Tour de Travoy) Today’s photo shows a memorial plaque at a roundabout in Nanteuil le Haudouin commemorating the Taxi de la Marne and the role they played during the First Battle of the Marne. This battle  in September 1914 was one of the biggest and bloodiest battles in … Continue reading Cycling 100 km along the frontline of the 1914 Battle of the Marne, which was arguably the biggest and bloodiest battle of all time